Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
, the president assassinated, bobby kennedy assassinated, the president's son killed in a senseless plane crash off cape cod, jacqueline kennedy died in her early 60s of cancer, ted kennedy, the whore at chappaquiddick where that young woman died in that accident. they identify also with the suffering that the family has gone through, because everybody lives to something a difficult in their lives. so it's the combination on the one hand of their fame and fortune, and on the other hand their suffering, their tragedy. but they are really the dynastic family. >> that will explain the public fascination but in this book he tells the truth and we've had a range of kennedy biographies. then there was the tearing them down at exposure of his womanizing and the concealment of his health problems, but i left his platoon this was a pretty positive portrait. he was my take away come to paint the picture of a president came in with a lot of faith and going to defer to his disasters, but he learned from that expense and by the time of the cuban missile crisis he realized he was also responsible for the dec
think it's the first reference that i saw in here at least he writes about bobby, and he later wrote the great book about bobby after his death. but he said to the editor of the new york times in ten of 1954, robert kennedy's letter is such an astonishing mixture of distortion and error that it deserves comment. [laughter] and the times for arguing that the trouble lay not with yalta, but with the subsequent violations. mr. kennedy suggested the agreement gave manchuria to soviet russia. china shall retain full sovereignty in manchuria. not that many years later he writes the most persuasive letter to "the new york times" about why bobby kennedy will be a good senator from the state of new york and why he deserves to run. so's not inflexible in terms of making judgments about things. but for me at least, watching that mind at work and watching him on the american landscape and not just going with the winds, but making strong judgments, this was an area that he knew well and probably did know a lot more than bobby did about what happened at yalta and was not afraid to pull his chain.
it is the first or reference to write about bobby after his death the editor of "the new york times" kennedy's letter was published february 3rd to deserved comments but not only with the agreements with the violation about why bobby kennedy was a good senator and why he was but always to make judgment. but to watch the landscape but this was the area us you know, well and probably more it was not afraid to pull his change. >> that brings up the point it it became very close to him and i used to visit my father at law school and we would go out to dinner and he and bobby would sit there and talks about the existential issues suffering so dramatically from the assassination of jack kennedy to talk about issues of do you believe in god. i remember vividly i remember to me that opened with my father not on the policy level but on a personal level. >> something to touch on he was also right tea film reviews. and it just does drop to have him give me a chapter and verse about the structure he was the forest, but not the bad way the spending the us numbers at the cape but had told in the winterti
." the number for republicans, 202- 585-3881. democrats, 202-585-3880. .ndependent, 202-585-3882 bobby jindal. let's listen to what he had to say. [video clip] >> we made the right decision not to expand medicaid. we are building a bottom-up alternative, delivering better health care for our people. host: your take. guest: they are not expanding coverage to uninsured residents. if you think that is important, it is not going to accomplish that. he may not want to spend the money on that. there are concerns about not enough primary care doctors. there may be interesting things with health care delivery at the state level in the way that medicaid is carried out. know where are they attempting to get health coverage to these folks, with one possible exception in wisconsin. scott walker has shifted some of the medicaid people onto the exchanges and offered medicaid. that may be on hold because of the problems at the federal exchanges. host: when you look at these decisions, who is making the decision, the governor or someone else? guest: for the most part it is governors who were never interested
at john kasich and bobby jindal and there's a lot of interesting governors out there. and they don't necessarily our in love with them, but chris christie deserves a lot of credit and he took on this and he has changed a lot about this in a way that is very impressive and i think that you have to start from there. when i work with specific people, there are a lot of different folks and i have talked with rob portman who knows about the irs. he's a manufacturer who is elected to the senate in wisconsin and that's a good example and mike burgess was a medical doctor in carrying this around and he has a smart phone. but his smart phone has an application that does cardiology. you can really put it up when he gets us with his smart phone and he gets where we are going. and tim griffin is a great congressman from arkansas and he knows the general direction we are going. and there's enough to be hopeful about. >> mr. speaker. we are taking questions from youtube and we have been online all week so we have some that people have e-mailed to us and we will start right now the first one. sin
at john kasich was return ohio around the bobby jindal who has the widest school choice program in the country. a lot of interesting governors. and candidly although some conservatives don't necessarily -- are not mr. in love with him but chris christie deserves a lot of credit. he took on a very blue state and he really has changed a lot about "breakout" in a way that's very impressive and i think we ought to start from there. when i work with specific people in congress, a lot of different folks in the last couple days, been talking with rob portman who knows a lot about the irs. ron johnson who is a manufacture was elected to the city in wisconsin would be a good example. mike barr just as a medical doctor who served in the u.s. house. carries around bashing his a smart phone, but a smartphone has an app that does cardiology. so he can cash in your getting an electrocardiogram on his smartphone. he forgets where he going and what we're trying to college. tim griffin is a great congressman from arkansas. florida knows the jump direction where to go when. there's enough to be h
the subcommittee and congressman bobby rush is the ranking memb member. >> the commissioners at ferc are with us today to put pressure very much your being here. i certainly initially would like to congratulate cheryl lafleur who has been appointed the acting director of ferc, and i enjoyed our meeting yesterday, ms. lafleur, and we look forward to working with you on many issues facing our country as we adjust to this changing landscape that we all are very much involved in. i would say that i think the transcendent issue that certainly encompasses everything we're talking about today does relate to the way the changing landscape is energy in america, with this low price natural gas we see a transmission from coal to natural gas. many states, and this administration particularly, are being very aggressive in trying to increase the amount of electricity produced from renewables as they try to address climate change. and i would say that as we move forward, and i would think you all particularly have to be sensitive to this, is that frequently meet people in the administration and other groups po
boot. people his nose and massages left on. i may not be much but i am sheriff of meghan county. bobby will fell on his knife. good night, sir. mr. tate stamp of of the porch. atticus said scout, mystery will fell on his knife. can you understand? atticus looked like he needed cheering about i hugged him and kissed him with all my might. yes, sir, i understand. .. >> that a applause is really for hr lee, not for me. i know that was a long passage, but it encapsulates so much of the book, and i think that today the lessons of the book live on. so often, i think we know that. and the great thing about what she did, i think, is that she took a very small town, small story and told it very well. but it made it universal. and timeless. and it's a great gift to our, to the country and to the world. i think it is unbelievably timeless and >> this book is the adventures of huckleberry finn, and it was banned in, i think, for many reasons similar to why "to kill a mockingbird" got banned. there was a lot of racism involved in this. the -- i'm sure everybody is familiar with the story of a young
though people like jeb bush, i'd bobby jindal, like chris christie, have been critical of the republican party, particularly in washington, the washington republican party. they somehow managed to do it from within, and i can't put my finger on why. that just doesn't translate the same way. i think he would be a constructive force. i would like to see him be a bigger factor than what he is. in the republican party. but really, outside of some moderate democrats like you in academia, via the jon huntsman contingency is quite small. >> hello. my name is jacob wagner. i'm chairman of the new hampshire college of republicans and -- >> hello. i know who you are. >> i tweet you an unhealthy amount during the week. >> i'm glad to see you look normal. [laughter] you do have like a twitter fascination with me so, you know last night i like you already. keep tweeting spent i agree with you so much i can't help it. i was an intern on jon huntsman's campaign. as much as it breaks my heart i agree with your analysis. i know i just want to really quick say thank you though for having the guts to call
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9